Monday, April 22, 2013

February 1, 2013, the Pratt Museum Community Gray Whale Skeleton was presented to the public as part of Homer's First Friday events. The Exhibit is called Encounters: Whales in our Waters.

Gray Whale Skeleton finally hung (and whole) inside the museum gallery.

Whales eye view of the rest of the gallery.

One has to admit that he does have a beautiful tail.

The rest of the exhibit was built around the whale skeleton.
Here Museum Curator, Scott Bartlett, installs another part of the exhibit.

The Gray Whale Skeleton was certainly the star of the show.

Many folks showed up for the exhibit opening.
And there was cake!

 A job well done by the Pratt Museum and the 
Homer Community Volunteers! Thank you!

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

The gray whale skeleton was moved from the workshop into the museum building Saturday, January 6, 2013, by a great team of 25 community volunteers. Thank you to all who participated.

So, this is where everyone got started--in the museum's workshop--where the different sections of the whale skeleton have been stored for these last few months.

Lee Post demonstrating where (and where not) the sections could be lifted and handled.

Then it was out the door of the workshop.

Down a ramp.

Across an icy parking lot.

Oh cool! A watercolor photo! (^-^) Then up the ramp to the front door of the museum building.

"Hey! What's all the racket?!!!" (The museum resident moose came to investigate.)

Some sections of the whale had been stored hanging close to the ceiling of the workshop, like the skull, tail and flippers.

So those sections had to be lowered down to the capable hands of the volunteers.

The skull got to ride on its own cart across the icy parking lot.

The jaws were transported . . .

. . .one half at a time.

Some sections, like these cervical vertebrae, were sent special delivery.

There goes one flipper. Looks like worried dad (behind them) is keeping a watchful eye.

And there goes the next flipper.

Ah, everything made it safe and sound inside the museum.

Hey beaked whale, you've got company!

Cool view. Lee spent the next day getting the sections ready to be put together . . .

Like attaching the ribs to the spine and the scapulae attached to the ribs.

That included cutting bolts and adding the pretty brass nuts to the rib cage frame.

As one observer said--the whale has beautiful nuts. All 68 of them.